Emergency Preparedness

JEFF POLLARD

Emergency Government Coordinator
jpollard@townofffreedom.org

 

Watches, Warning & Alerts - stay up to date!

 

Outagamie County partnered with AtHoc to implement a new mass notification system to allow citizens to self register for emergency alerts. When an emergency happens in your neighborhood and the 911 center needs to get urgent information to you, AtHoc will ensure you get critical alerts and actionable information. You may also register to receiver weather information. Sign up today!

 

Alert and Notices:

 


 

Do 1 Thing

Monthly Reminder

♦ Small steps toward being prepared for an emergency ♦
Do 1 Thing is a 12-month program that makes it easy for you to prepare yourself, your family, and your community for emergencies or disasters.
 

Do1Thing in January: Make a Plan

Understand what puts you at risk from disasters and take steps to lower your risk.
 
Tasks
• Plan what to do if you have to evacuate.
Choose two places for your family to meet. One should be right outside your home in case of a sudden emergency, such as a fire.
• Take steps now to prevent damage to your home in a disaster.
Once you know what disasters could happen in your community, there are things you can do to lower your risk of injury or property damage.
• Learn what disasters can happen in your area and decide what you will do in a disaster.
Knowing what disasters could happen can help you know how to be prepared and what to do. Contact your local American Red Cross or emergency management office to learn more about the disasters in your area.

 

Archives
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September 2016              August 2016

 

FEMA
Take Extra Precautions as Temperatures Drop and Snow Moves In

Here is more information and tips to keep you safe!

Emergency Kit

 

News Release

Are you ready for Winter?

Time to get your home and care ready for cold and snow!

 

Rural Americans at higher risk of death from five leading causes

Press Release

Thursday, January 12, 2017, 1:00 p.m. ET

A new CDC study demonstrates that Americans living in rural areas are more likely to die from five leading causes than their urban counterparts. In 2014, many deaths among rural Americans were potentially preventable, including 25,000 from heart disease, 19,000 from cancer, 12,000 from unintentional injuries, 11,000 from chronic lower respiratory disease, and 4,000 from stroke. The percentages of deaths that were potentially preventable were higher in rural areas than in urban areas. The report and a companion commentary are part of a new rural health series in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

To view the balance of the article: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p0112-rural-death-risk.html